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The Girl on Mill Street | Peter Gilboy | Full Review

The Girl on Mill Street - Peter Gilboy, Soneela Nankani

According to Gooodreads, there are  81,688 books with 'Girl' in the title.

Gone Girl, The Girl on the Train, The Girl with the Dragon Tattoo, The Good Girl.

 

Note: I received a free NetGalley review copy of this book.

 

 

'Girl' books are popular, but they rarely feature actual girls, they feature women. Peter Gilboy seems to be aware of the inconsistency when it comes to these 'Girl' titles, despite the name of his own book, The Girl on Mill StreetMill Street does feature a girl, kind of. It also features two women. Annie Taylor was a girl when her mother, Sunny Taylor, went missing on Mill Street, but as she tells her story now she is a woman. The very first sentence of  Mill Street is written perfectly by Gilboy.

"I'm nineteen now and no longer a girl. I'm a woman in every way that counts."

 

The Girl on Mill Street is a classic crime story of who-dun-it, but instead of focusing on the classic detective, it follows the story of Annie recounting her own experiences of the loss of her mother and subsequent charging of her father. Gilboy takes the reader on a fast-paced journey which leaves us guessing as to whether or not Annie's father is as innocent as she believed, and whether our fears truely define us.

 

Smattered with Freudian quotes, The Girl on Mill Street is also a lesson in psychology, whether you agree with Freud or not. It is clear from the first page that, if Gilboy doesn't have a background in psychology himself, he has at least done a reasonable amount of research into the topic for this book. It lends a sense of authenticity to his writing of both Annie and her father, as well as some of the actions in the book.

 

At just over 200 pages, The Girl on Mill Street is a quick but satisfying read, perfect for any readers interested in crime stories, psychology, or courtroom suspense novels. My only problem with the story was one event quite central to the plot that was left open by the end.